Rosemary Zucchini Goat Cheese Pancakes and Balsamic Reduction Sauce

My Mom is visiting me at the moment. It’s been great having rotating cooks in the kitchen. Among visiting some of our favorite local spots in Switzerland, recently we traveled to Morocco for one week. During our trip, I unfortunately caught a slight case of food poisoning, after eating chicken from a small restaurant. After this experience, the sight and smell of any type of meat makes me slightly nauseous and sick. I’ve never been a big meat-eater as is, but for the time being, I’m avoiding it until the desire to eat it returns, if it ever does.

Despite my little incident, the trip was fabulous. Morocco is one of my favorite countries to visit, the landscape is so diverse and the people are very warm and welcoming. We spent a lovely evening in an old fortified mountain town, Ben Ait Haddou.  Our riad hosts were so wonderful, we didn’t have to leave the hotel for entertainment. They served us a 4 course dinner consisting of: cucumber, tomato, onion, lemon and olive oil salad served with Moroccan country bread, followed by a chicken and vegetable tagine, full of yummy goodness, a lovely plate of the sweetest watermelon I’ve ever tasted and of course the customary mint tea – infused with thyme. After stuffing us to our capacity, the hotel owner serenaded us with traditional Berber music and then handed out drums to everyone and that’s when the party started. We danced, sang to songs we didn’t understand and laughed until the wee hours of the night. Unfortunately, I was too busy chomping away to snap pictures of the food.

Now that I’m back home, I’m just having fun testing out some new and interesting veggie recipes. I recently found a recipe that combines some of my favorite things, savory and sweet, breakfast type food at dinner time. This was a big hit at the dinner table. It’s light enough for a nice summer dinner, simple enough to prepare in under 30 – 40 minutes and fancy enough to impress your friends at your next dinner party.

What you need.

Salad + Dressing

  • your favorite salad ingredients. I used: oak leaf lettuce, apples, carrots, mixed nuts and raisins
  • 1/2 cup of balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp of brown sugar

Pancakes

  • 100 g flour (app. 1 c)
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 – 2 sprigs of rosemary, finely chopped
  • 1 egg
  • 150 ml (app. 3/4 c milk)
  • 1 TBSP butter
  • Olive oil
  • 1 small zucchini sliced slightly thin
  • 50 g (1/2 c goat cheese)

How you make it.

balsamic reduction

  1. Make your salad.
  2. Heat the balsamic on medium, once it decreases to about half the original amount, add your brown sugar.
  3. Stir frequently until the sauce thickens. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Once cool, drizzle over your salad (and pancakes too if you’d like).

Pancakes

  1. Mix flour, baking powder, a pinch of salt and rosemary in a bowl.
  2. Mix milk and egg in another bowl, make a well in dry ingredients, pour in, mix. Place the batter in the fridge until you’re ready to use it.
  3. Slice up zucchini, cook in olive oil and butter until slightly brown (about 3-4 minutes on each side).
  4. Add your goat cheese and zucchini to the batter, folding the ingredients in carefully.
  5. Using a ladle or big spoon, scoop mixture in an oiled pan on medium high heat. Cook about 3 minutes on one side or until bubbles start to appear, flip and finish cooking.

Serve these pancakes right away, warm and with dip them in your salad sauce for a savory and sweet treat. This recipe makes about 6 medium-sized pancakes, so enough for 2 people.

Sunday Berry Compote Pancakes

How I love Sundays. Even if it signals the end of the weekend, it truly is my favorite day. I usually wake up slowly, catch up on the news, read and enjoy lounging around in my pajamas until noon. Sometimes I dare to even take a stroll to the bakery to buy a moist loaf of tresse/challah bread. You’ll rarely find the Swiss strolling around or running errands in their PJs, especially on Sunday. I’ve realized over the years this is something very American. The Swiss on the other hand dress to the nines on Sunday. I just don’t see the point of changing into clothes, if my mission is to buy bread and go back to my lazy Sunday program.

This week, I decided to make pancakes and lounge around the house all morning. I wanted rich, fluffy pancakes reminiscent of the buttermilk pancakes my grandmother used to make me on her cast iron griddle when I was a child. I remember the way the syrup would literally disappear into the feathery stack of pancakes. *drools*

Since I didn’t have any buttermilk and am not too impressed with the milk and vinegar alternative, I used plain yogurt. I topped my pancakes with a mixed berry compote, butter and maple syrup (no need to hold back). The result was rich, fluffy, slightly tart, delicious pancakes.

Makes 8 – 9, 4 – 6 inch pancakes

What you need.

For pancakes:

  • 1 c flour
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 3/4 tsp sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 8 oz  of plain yogurt
  • 1 TBSP of oil (e.g. canola, sunflower, flax)
  • possibly, a small amount of milk (or water) to make the mixture slightly thinner

For compote:

  • 1.5 – 2 c of frozen mixed berries
  • 1/4 c water
  • juice from a fresh lemon
  • 2-3 cloves
  • 1/4 c raisins

How you make it.

Pancakes:

  1. Preheat your oven to about 100 F/ 50 C and place a pan/casserole dish with a cover inside your oven.
  2. Mix all your dry ingredients. Make a well in the middle.
  3. Mix all your wet ingredients, stir them into your dry until combined.
  4. If the mixture if really thick you can add a little milk or water to thin it out slightly. I added about 4 TBSP of milk.
  5. Heat a pan with oil, once hot spoon out your pancake mixture into the pan. Flip the pancakes when many bubbles form on top.
  6. Place cooked pancakes in casserole dish, to keep warm before serving.

Compote:

  1. Place all of your ingredients in a sauce pan, simmer on low for about 15 minutes.
  2. Serve warm over pancakes.

Enjoy!

Fish Chowdah

On Monday, I  checked out my friends’ Facebook photos the Boston Marathon. I couldn’t help but feel a bit envious. I recall Marathon Monday being such a lively and fun day. People from all over lining the streets and strolling throughout the city, infected with contagious excitement and energy. My friends posted pictures Monday of blue skies and their sideline views of runners.

I went to bed early that night reminiscing on my city and feeling a little homesick. Words can’t express how surreal it was to wake up on Tuesday morning to learn there were explosions at the Boston Marathon. My heart really goes out to anyone and everyone, affected by the horrible events that took place at the marathon. In fact, my heart goes out to anyone out there in the world that is witness or a victim to such nauseating incidents. Seeing this kind of thing happen in a city as beautiful as my own, at a marathon, well it just all seems so pointless and sad.

Yesterday, after speaking with family and friends and confirming that they were all safe. I really wanted to eat something from home. I decided to make fish chowder. This recipe is very simple, rich and delicious. It took me back to memories of strolling outside in Quincy Market and grabbing a quick cup of chowdah with friends. It made me think about all the positive things about Boston. It’s a city with so much culture and distinctiveness. An incident like yesterday won’t and shouldn’t define it.

Recipe adapted from Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything

What you need.

  • 2 c stock
  • 2 TBSP flour (optional)
  • 1 tsp fresh or dried thyme
  • 1 c minced onion
  • 2 cups peeled, cubed potatoes
  • 1 c cream + 1 c milk (or you can opt to only use milk)
  • 2 cups diced white fish
  • 1 TBSP butter (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

How you make it.

  1. In a pot or large sauce pan over a medium heat, sauté onions in about 2 TBSP olive oil . Cook for about 10 minutes or until tender, do not brown.
  2. Sprinkle flour on top and mix, add in thyme.
  3. Pour in stock and add potatoes, cook over a medium-high heat until potatoes are tender, about 10 – 15 minutes.
  4. Season with salt and pepper, pour in cream, milk and fish and cook on low heat until fish is done cooking, about 5 – 8 minutes. Add a TBSP of butter and mix once dissolved. Taste and adjust, if needed.

All that was missing were the oyster crackers. =)

Serves 4, Enjoy!

 

Sourdough Pizza

I think I’ve died and gone to pizza dough heaven. Recently, I tried my hand at making sourdough pizza. The rise time is longer than a recipe using commercial yeast, but I think the process is actually easier. The dough browned beautifully and had an incredible crunch and slightly acidic taste.

You can start this dough in the morning and by the time you return home in the evening, most of the work will already be done.

The below recipe makes enough for two thin crust pizzas

What you need.

  • 3 c flour
  • 4 TBSP starter
  • 3/4 c luke warm water
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 TBSP honey
  • 1 TBSP olive oil

How you make it.

  1. In a cup or bowl, mix water and starter, until the starter dissolves. Add honey and mix well.
  2. In a separate bowl mix flour and salt. Make a well in the center and pour in the starter mixture and oil. Mix well, use a wooden spoon (and your hands) to incorporate all the ingredients until you have what resembles a messy dough ball.
  3. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, place it in a warm area of the house and let it rise 10 – 12 hours, it should double in size.
  4. After the dough has risen, knead it for about 5 – 10 minutes, cover with the plastic wrap and let it rest for 15 minutes.
  5. Preheat your oven to the highest setting.
  6. Split the dough in half you can freeze one, if you don’t plan on making both. Roll out the dough and top with your ingredients of choice. I used mozzarella, salmon, chives, and tomato sauce and mushrooms.
  7. Bake the pizza for 7-10 minutes or until golden brown.

Enjoy!

Colombian Arepas

A dear friend visited me over the holidays. She came bearing all kinds of lovely goodies, including a Colombian cookbook. I’m looking forward to trying out some of the recipes.

After a day of sight-seeing, she kindly demonstrated how to make arepas, Columbian style. An arepa is a baked, grilled or fried corn patty, typically served with meat, cheese, eggs or vegetables. I absolutely LOVE arepas, they’re so nutritious and practical. I usually make them Venezuelan style. This type is thicker and eaten in a similar fashion to a hamburger — you slice the corn patty open and fill it with your ingredients of choice. My friend told me the Colombian version is much thinner and you typically put the ingredients on top of the arepa.

Tonight she prepared some arepas for me and my husband. I took a night off, observed her in action, set the table and prepared a little mixture of rucola, garlic, lemon and olive oil to go with the arepas. The below recipe makes 7 – 8 medium-sized arepas.

What you need.

  • 2 c. of pre-cooked corn flour (typically you can find this in an ethnic grocery store or grocery store aisle, some brands include P.A.N., Doña Arepa)
  • 2 c. warm water (a little more if the dough is too dry)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • canola or sunflower oil

How you make it.

  1. Pre-heat oven to 200F/105 C. Place an ovenproof dish in the oven.
  2. Pour corn flour in a bowl.Add in 1 tsp of salt.
  3. Gradually add water 1/2 c water at a time, mixing with your hands each time to incorporate the dough. Once you add all the water, the mixture should form a ball. The dough shouldn’t be too dry nor too wet/sticky.
  4. Place just enough oil in a pan to coat the bottom and heat the pan on medium-high heat.
  5. Take a handful of the dough and flatten it with your hands to form a flat circle. Use your fingers to smooth out the edges.
  6. Place the patty in the oil and fry until golden brown, carefully flip it and do the same for theuncooked side. Place the arepa in the oven-proof dish and cover to keep warm.
  7. Continue until you finish cooking all arepas.

Cover the arepa with your ingredients of choice. I added cheddar cheese, tomatoes and rucola tossed with garlic, lemon and olive oil.

Enjoy!

Simple Roasted Curry-Flavored Okra

Who’s looking forward to the next couple of days off? Me! Last week was the kind of week, where I managed to get just enough sleep to stay sane, woke up, dashed in and out of the shower, grabbed some fruit and ran from train to work and class. I’d come home in the evening to a pile of clothes that eventually turned into a mountain and just pop some type of vegetable in the oven and hope for the best. I only have a cat, so chapeau and lots of respect to those with children, I don’t know how you juggle it all!

Any how, on my way home from teaching last week, I had a bit of time until my train arrived, so I popped into an African grocer near the train station. At the grocer’s I found okra, a staple vegetable from my childhood. I haven’t had it in years! Back then, I ate it battered and fried– no surprise there, what isn’t battered and fried in Alabama, hehehe! Anyway, this was one of my favorite childhood veggies.

In another attempt to just pop something in the oven and save time and stay healthy, I accidentally made the best okra I’ve ever had! It was tangy and flavorful, with a beautifully browned crunchy crust. Some people are turned off by okra because it can be a little slimy in texture. This recipe is really nice for those who avoid okra for this reason.

Roasted Curry-Flavored Okra

What you need.

  • Okra
  • Olive oil
  • Salt, pepper, curry to taste

How you make it.

  1. Wash your okra and pat it dry.
  2. Place okra in a bowl, add about 2 TBSP of olive oil (depends on how much you’re making), season with salt, pepper and curry.
  3. Roast on 425 for 15 – 20 minutes, or until browned and slightly crisp.

I served this with salad, fruits and cheese – as I was looking for a quick healthy lunch. Enjoy!

Pain au Levain/ Sourdough Bread

LONGEST POST EVER:

A couple of weeks ago, I ate dinner at a friend’s. At some point during the evening she removed a loaf of bread from the oven. It was the most lovely shade of amber. She told it was naturally leavened bread that she made using a homemade starter (culture of yeast and bacteria). Me, being the curious cook that I am, and lover of anything natural and healthy, decided to make my own starter and try my hand at sourdough bread.

I won’t go into details about the chemistry of the process, I’ll leave that to the experts and will instead put some links at the bottom of the page. I will try to walk you through my process for creating a starter or levain to bake your first fresh loaf.

Starter/Levain

What you need.

  • Patience and faith that it will work out.
  • 1/2 c or 50 grams flour: I used a mix of rye (yeast apparently loves this stuff), non bleached all-purpose and wheat flour
  • slightly less than 1/2 c or 1.2 deciliters of filtered, bottled, or *tap water

If your tap water is drinkable, use it. Many recommend bottled water, because it could contain small levels of chlorine, which inhibit yeast growth. To remove chlorine, leave a glass of water out overnight and it should evaporate.

How you cultivate it.

  1. Buy or wash out a jar with a lid, that has about 1 L or greater capacity
  2. In a bowl mix 1/2 c of flour (50 grams) and a little less than 1/2 cup of water (app. 1 deciliter). Many bloggers use a total hydration method that entails mixing equal amounts of flour and water. Using slightly less water worked better from me, it stopped the mixture from separating. This could depend on the environment you live in. It’s all about trial and error.
  3. Pour the mixture into your clean jar. Cover partly. Do not close the lid completely, as the culture of yeast will produce carbon dioxide gas as they metabolize sugars. This causes the dough to rise, which is what we want to see, however the gases also need room to escape the jar. You can partially tighten the lid or punch a few small holes in cling wrap and cover it with this instead.
  4. About 12 – 24 hours later, on days  2 – 7 (or longer), stir the mixture, get rid of half. If you use a scale and when you weigh your original ingredients, it will be easier to know precisely how much mixture to remove. Otherwise, you can eyeball the mixture or pour out 1/2 cup. Place the rest in a bowl and add in a little less than 1/2 c water stir, stir in 1/2 c flour, partially cover and let it sit overnight. Repeat every day. By days 4-7, your mixture should bubble and rise consistently, if not, continue feeding it, until it does consistently.
  5. Every other day, clean your jar out. This is important to determine, whether your starter is rising. I put a sticker on my jar at the level of the starter to confirm that it has risen.
  6. Do not use the starter until day 7 or later.

Trouble shooting:

  • If your starter is not doubling, place it on top of a warm appliance or in my case on a heated floor.
  • If you experience a layer of separation between the liquid and the starter or water on the surface, try reducing your amount of water.

Pain au levain/ Sourdough bread (1 loaf)

What you need.

For starter: a little less than 1/2 c water and 1/2 c flour

For sponge: a little less than 1 c  water and 2 c flour

For the dough: a little less than 1 c water mixed with 1 TBSP of honey, 2 c flour, 2 tsp salt

How you make it.

  1. Day 1. Starter/Levain. After your starter is established on day 7, maybe later, remove half and place it in a jar or a large bowl. Note: After your starter is established, you can use the 1/2 that you remove to make pancakes, as scraps in biscuits, pass it along to a friend, etc.
  2. Pour in water (slightly less than 1/2 c), mix, add in 1/2 c flour. Cover with cling wrap and let this mixture sit over night or 12 – 24 hours, until it has doubled in size.
  3. Day 2. Making the sponge: In a bowl, add a 1 cup of lukewarm water to your levain, mix until slushy, then add 2 c. (100 grams) flour. Cover with cling wrap and place in a warm place. Let this mixture sit 6 -8 hours or overnight.
  4. Day 3. Making the dough: In a separate  bowl, pour in 2 cups of flour. In a cup, mix water in a cup with honey (optional). Mix this in with your flour, until it forms a rough ball. Let the dough sit for about 15 minutes so the flour can absorb the water.
  5. Sprinkle 2 tsp of salt over the dough and combine this with your sour dough sponge until incorporated. Don’t be afraid to get a little messy. You could use your kitchenaid to do this, since I don’t have one I did it with a spoon and by hand. Do not knead. Shape as desired and place it in a lightly oiled baking dish and allow it to rise in an oiled bowl for 4-7 hours. If you do this in the morning, you’ll have bread for the evening.
  6. 30 minutes before baking your bread, preheat your oven to the about 440 F / 230 C. Boil about 3 cups of water and place in an ovenproof dish. Place this dish on the bottom shelf of your oven. This will help the crust turn a nice amber brown and provide a moist baking environment.
  7. Place the dough in the oven and bake for 50 minutes or until it sounds hollow when tapped. Half way through baking, reduce the temperature to about 400 F / 200 C. Allow the bread to cool on a wire rack. Try your best not to slice the bread until it’s cooled.

There are tons of creative ways to shape and form the dough. Since this was my first attempt, I wanted to start simple.

This bread tastes remarkable, slightly acidic, with a nice crunchy exterior and moist and airy inside. I would like to work on getting more air bubbles in my dough, practice makes perfect.

Please note: Store starter in glass, plastic containers or stainless steel. Clear containers make it easier to observe your starter.

I will warn you, you will become obsessed with your starter. It looks likes a creamy blob of water and flour, but somehow you will regard it as beautiful. Like me, you may come home and instead giving your husband a hug as soon as you walk in or feeding and cuddle your cat, dog, what have you not, you will run to your starter and observe it. Somehow, it will become part of your family– just be sure you don’t neglect your family members.

Another warning, making naturally, leavened bread is not a time-consuming or arduous task, the yeast and the bacteria do most of the work, you just have to mix here and there. However, it is a long process that requires a lot of patience. Especially, if you decide to make your own starter, you’ll have to wait 1 to 2 weeks until you taste the fruits of your labor. Let me tell you, it is SO worth it.

Have you made sourdough bread? Any tips/tricks, recipes you’d like to share?

Links:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/

http://eattheroses.wordpress.com/2012/08/22/sourdough-focaccia-and-what-sourdough-is-and-is-not/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sourdough

http://sourdough.com/recipes/home-bread

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/keyword/gerard-rubaud

Potato Frittata with Scallions and Cheese

My good friend Kate and I both heart  Deb Perelman’s food blog, Smitten Kitchen. I was thrilled when Kate gave me The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook for my birthday!

I absolutely love this cookbook, it’s wonderful and so refreshing. It includes wonderful tips, cute and funny personal stories about the author and her family. It’s written in a very intimate way. At times, you feel as if you’re sitting at a bar stool in her tiny Manhattan kitchen, while she walks you through the recipe step by step. This books gives me a case of teeny-tiny kitchen envy– I love small spaces, but that’s a story for another day! My favorite part of the book is the simple, colorful and vibrant pictures, the images just pop right off the pages.

Last week, I adapted her recipe for Potato Frittata with feta and scallions. She listed this recipe under breakfast and I made this for dinner. This would definitely be a big hit at brunch. It’s very filling, so have your appetite ready or a few hungry stomachs around the dinner table, if you try this recipe. The original recipe calls for bacon and since I don’t like bacon, I excluded it. Additionally, she used feta, but I used Gruyère, a little ricotta and added mushrooms.

You can totally make this without meat and use vegetables and cheese. I actually was going to make it without any meat, but my husband suggested throwing in the leftover ground beef we had in the fridge. The final result was a rich, protein packed frittata with lots of flavor. I paired it with a salad to lighten things up a bit. My husband loved this dish, I think it had all the makings of Swiss food that he’s used to: potatoes, cheese, eggs, and meat.

Serves 3 – 4

What you need.

  • Olive oil
  • 4 medium large potatoes, diced
  • salt, black pepper
  • 1/4 lb or 115 g rams of cooked ground beef (optional)
  • 2 scallions, finely sliced
  • 5 -6 mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 c of Gruyère or cheese of choice
  • 1/4 c of ricotta (optional)
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 – 2 TBSP of milk or cream

How you make it.

  1. Preheat your oven to 400 F/ 200 C.
  2. Peel and dice potatoes into small cubes.
  3. Pour about 1 – 2 TBSP of olive oil into a baking pan or oven proof skillet.
  4. Toss the potatoes in the oil and season generously with salt and pepper (and a pinch of nutmeg if you like).
  5. Place in the oven and roast for about 25- 30 minutes or until they’re almost cooked.
  6. While your potatoes are cooking, chop up your vegetables and prepare your cheese (and prepare your meat if you’re using it. I had a small amount of day old ground beef, so just put it on the side).
  7. Beat eggs, ricotta and cream, season lightly/to taste with salt and pepper.
  8. When your potatoes are light brown and almost done roasting, take them out of the oven and cover with your vegetables and cheese.
  9. Pour eggs on top, cover the dish with foil and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the foil and bake another 10 minutes, or until the eggs set in the center.

Remember, bring your appetite for this dish, because it’s very nutritious and filling! Enjoy!

Roasted Potato Medley

There’s one vegetable that I miss a lot from home and that’s sweet potatoes. Actually, you can find sweet potatoes in Switzerland, but the trick is finding good ones. A couple of years back on Thanksgiving, I desperately tried to recreate my Aunt Henrietta’s sweet potato pie recipe. Major fail! The potatoes at the grocery store were long, thin, frail remnants of sweet potatoes.

Today, while picking up some veggies at the grocery store I happened to come across lovely sweet potatoes– jack pot! I made one for lunch and the taste was absolutely wonderful!
I imagine this recipe would work well as a healthy alternative to fries and would complement a hearty salad or grilled meat. I just ate it as a meal and enjoyed every bite.

What you need.

  • Potato of choice,  I used Russet
  • Sweet potato
  • Carrots
  • Olive oil
  • Salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, paprika

How you make it.

  1. Preheat oven to 400 (app 200 C)
  2. Cut  thin/medium (app 1/4 in, .60cm) potato slices
  3. Cut medium slices of carrots
  4. Oil the bottom of a baking dish, places veggies on the bottom of the pan and drizzle oil on top
  5. Season slices.
  6. Bake for about 30 – 40 minutes or until roasted, golden brown and tender.

I used the grill setting on my oven, perhaps this would work nicely in a broiler as well.

Enjoy!

Quick Pan-Seared Herb-Crusted Salmon

I typically try to post on Mondays, however I came down with the flu on Sunday. The hubs quarantined me in the bedroom and forced me out of the kitchen. He served me snacks, tea and even gave me a little bell to ring if  I needed him to bring me anything else. I’ll admit it, I rang the bell once or twice *hides in shame*. It was my chance to have a  Downton Abbey experience (minus the sprawling estate, fabulous 1920s attire and the artillery of maids).

Now all is back to normal and I’m back in the kitchen, apron and all. Here’s a quick recipe for salmon. If you love salmon and are short on time, this recipe is perfect. It’s packed with flavor and will be on the dinner table within 15 – 20 minutes.

What you need.

  • (Wild) salmon with skin
  • dried pepper, sea salt, red pepper, thyme, dill (or your seasoning of choice)
  • olive oil
  • fresh lemon, to taste

How you make it.

  1. Season both sides of the salmon
  2. Heat about 3 – 4 TBSP (or enough to cover the surface of your fish) of olive oil in pan on medium-high heat.
  3. Carefully place salmon in the pan – skin side down. Cook the salmon for about 4 minutes.
  4. Flip the salmon and cook for about 1 -2 minutes. Pour a small amount of water about 1/8 cup or enough to barely cover the bottom of the pan. Cover the pan, to create a steam effect. Cook salmon (still on med-hi heat) for about 5 minutes and allow it to absorb the water.  If you have a very thick piece, it might take 8 – 10 minutes.

Serve with a side of rice and salad and you’re good to go!